The Necessity of Atheism

A Maronite nun prays in a church in the center of Beirut on March 18, 2016 as Maronite Christians prepare the mark Easter according to the Catholic calendar. (Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

A Maronite nun prays in a church in the center of Beirut on March 18, 2016 as Maronite Christians prepare the mark Easter according to the Catholic calendar. (Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

by Derek Beres

Upon learning of the drowning of Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1822, the London Courier took a shot at the deceased poet's atheism by writing, "now he knows whether there is a God or no." Shelley's wife, Mary, who had published Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus only four years prior, probably didn't enjoy the jab at her late husband, victim of a sudden storm in the Gulf of Spezia.

Percy Shelley never achieved widespread fame during his lifetime. After death his writing spread—The Cenci, Prometheus Unbound, and Hellas became classics. Along the way the poet penned essays and journal entires describing his transition from mystical pantheism to atheism. In 1811he published "The Necessity of Atheism," for which he received flack from the religiously-inclined. Two years later, while writing his poem, Queen Mab, he expanded and revised the essay.

Shelley was living during England's golden age of scientific discovery. As a student at Oxford he fell in love with the new technology of ballooning. He equated the epic flights of silk balloons, which would soon carry humans, with liberation, himself once securing a revolutionary pamphlet on a number of balloons that he launched from a Lynmouth beach.

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